Ganesha, our cosmic symbol of life and death

For a majority of worshippers it’s not possible to worship the formless. Lord Ganesha, the supreme being Ganpati (the elephant of elephants; the son of beautiful goddess Parvati; the god with a child’s body and an elephant’s head) must follow the cosmic law and become formless after being shaped out of clay, painstakingly decorated by artists & sculptors and celebrated year after year by his ardent admirers. Could it possibly be that like life & death, the God we love most must be submerged as a symbol of this very reality. Is it why each year Ganesha arrives to teach us that though our form changes to the formless, the Supreme Truth remains the same: that the body perishes but the ideals or stories residing in it remain a constant?

Ganesh Visarjan after a day and a half: Celebrating life requires resources and patience. Hence I suppose the various short and long timelines for the immersion of the idol. This one goes to the ocean

Ganesh Visarjan after a day and a half: Celebrating life requires resources and patience. Hence I suppose the various short and long timelines for the immersion of the idol. This one goes into the ocean with the followers wishing, chanting, singing and dancing that he will give them the resources and opportunities to celebrate his life again next year.

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About shabnamphoto

I'm a graphic artist with a passion for photography. I like to tell a story with my pictures. Sometimes a picture may speak on its own and at other times it may need an explanation. I'm intrigued by the ordinariness of life and enjoy documenting my life in the light and shadow of what surrounds me. Be it people, landscape, flowers, architecture or birds, the camera helps me see what I wouldn't with my naked eye.
This entry was posted in Documentary, Photo essay, Street Photography and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Ganesha, our cosmic symbol of life and death

  1. Anonymous says:

    Shabnam, you write so well. Beautiful lines (Y)

    Like

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